Happy to recycle

Last night as I was organizing some drawers, I stumbled across a few folders from the hospital. In them was a bunch of info and documents from the hospitalization when V got diagnosed with T1D and from her first Endo follow up visit. I have to give it to the hospital: they pulled out all the stops and gave us a ton of info and resources. There were even flyers for medical bracelets. And there was a folder from JDRF with a welcome letter that started out with “You are not alone.” They did it everything to set us ip for success. And it was with some amusement that I looked at the records of our follow up appointment. Initial A1C: 12.3. Uncontrolled diabetes. Possible Celiac (wish that didn’t change to “definite Celiac” a couple of months later.) And at the bottom of the page, there was our first sliding scale.

Yep, like many others, we started with the sliding scale, where we had three types of insulin, mixed two of them once a day into one shot, and had to stick to a fairly rigid meal schedule both time and carbs-wise. It was ok for the first couple of months and in some ways it was actually helpful because if gave us some structure and some concrete rules to follow. It also allowed us to not need an injection at lunchtime in school, which made things simpler. But as we gained more experience in diabetes management, it started to feel more and more forced. We felt like we were feeding to V’s insulin schedule instead of giving insulin to meet V’s needs.

We ditched the sliding scale a few months after diagnosis and never looked back. And last night, after looking over those papers from 2013, I was happy to recycle them. We’ve come a long way since V’s initial diagnosis and we keep moving forward.

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Carb-free, taste-full.

V is starting to cook a little here and there. And let me tell you, she makes kickass scrambles. Driven by necessity of finding an appetizing and filling carb-free meal to eat when BG is high, she created this beauty. Eggs, cheese, avocado, bell pepper and sprinkles of sriracha. It tastes as good as it looks.

New Flavors of Arctic Zero

Disclosure: I received free samples for review. All opinions are my own.

I’ve reviewed Arctic Zero frozen treats last year in this post. We like them because they have lots of great-tasting gluten-free flavors and are much lower in carbs than regular ice-cream. In the beginning of this year, the company unveiled new flavors and gave us an opportunity to preview and taste them.

First, I have to give it to Arctic Zero for presentation. It’s so exciting when the box arrives beautifully packaged. IMG_2836

If you don’t live near a store that carries Arctic Zero or does not have flavors you want, you can order online and they will ship it to you, too. Pro tip: don’t touch dry ice. Not even though a bag. Because OMG OUCH!

We sampled the following gluten-free flavors: Cake Batter, Banana Pudding and Poppin’ Pomegranate.

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And we liked them all! As usual, everyone had their favorites. I didn’t think I’d like Cake Batter much but it turned out to be my favorite. V loved Banana Pudding the best. She was reluctant to try Pomegranate but liked it, too! Again, it’s helpful to remember that Arctic Zero treats are not like ice-cream. In their consistency they are more like less sweet sorbet.

Arctic Zero treats taste best when you allow them to warm up and soften for about 15-20 minutes. Also, V made up an easy smoothie/milk shake recipe that works great with either flavor:

Take half a cup of milk, half a cup of Arctic Zero, and half a cup of your fruit of choice, chopped. (We are partial to strawberries in our smoothies.) Blend everythig together in a blender for a couple of minutes and enjoy! You get a glass-full of a treat that is delicious and low in carbs (about 18 g. for the whole thing; compared to over 20 g. of carbs for half a cup of regular ice-cream.)

Cheers!

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The Pain of Saying no to Ice Cream

 

I wrote another post for Insulin Nation and it was published recently. I wrote a response to Insulin Nation’s earlier article about a research study that looked at barriers to feeding young T1Ds a healthy diet. It really got me thinking and motivated me to ask my friends in the academia to get me the full text of the research study.

I opened up my post with a personal recollection of one of my most painful memories shortly after V’s T1D diagnosis. For better or worse, the opening story gave rise to a catchy title (created by Insulin Nation), one that compels people to respond before they read the actual article. It generated some strong opinions on the Insulin Nation Facebook page. (You have to scroll down to find the post with my article.) I find it fascinating that some people seem to think that handling treats is as simple as counting the carbs and giving the right amount of insulin. And maybe it’s that simple for adults, but I find the matter a lot more complicated with kids, especially with the younger ones. And I had already written about the fallacy of thinking that a person with type 1 diabetes can eat whatever they want. 

I’d love to know what you think. Here we go: The Pain of Saying No To Ice Cream

Diabetes Awareness Week, Day 25

The fallacy of carb-free turkey?

I’ve been reading a lot lately about how there may not be such a thing as carb-free turkey or steak. Basically, if you are going to eat a large portion of something that is high in fat, it will eventually metabolize as glucose. There is a particularly good piece on DiabetesMine about it. And Dr. Pettus talked about it at the TCOYD conference. And let me tell you, both of my kids can eat a hearty portion. So tomorrow I will conduct an experiment. I will not assume that turkey is carb-free. (Because you can be sure that it will involve a LOT of butter, so..umm..lots of fat. YUM.) I’m going to add some carbs to V’s bolus and see how the feast agrees with her. Heck, maybe I should assume that if she eats a metric ton of Brussel sprouts I should throw in a few carbs for them, too? And maybe  a couple of grams for deviled eggs? But excuse me, since when half a cup of mashed potatoes is 19 g? Isn’t it supposed to be 15 g.? Oh wait… There’s butter. Lots of butter. Better add those carbs in, I suppose… Hmm, I think tomorrow’s dinner will involve a lot of insulin.

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Diabetes Awareness Month, Day 16

So remember how I said that not every post will be new? I’m going to link you to one of my older post about carbs. Why? Because it’s late and I’m tired. And also because I worked really hard on that post and it has a lot of useful info. And also because carbs is probably the second most misunderstood food-thing about type 1 diabetes, after sugar. So if you haven’t read it yet, go read it. If you have read it before, thank you and feel free to read it again for a refresher.

Let’s talk about carbs, baby…