Sleepover: Behind The Scenes in 20 Screenshots

Sleepovers are the bane of my existence. It’s hard enough to manage T1D when V is sleeping a few feet away in her room. When she is elsewhere, we become the 24-hour on-call support and security center. Some nights are completely uneventful. Other nights we barely sleep. This is another invisible aspect of diabetes management, which most people are hardly aware of. I’m about to give you a little glimpse of what it takes to manage misbehaving BG when V is sleeping away from home.

V spent last night at her friend’s house. Before she got there, the daytime BG was fairly good. Trouble started brewing around dinner time.

So everything got back on track. Or so we thought, because at 9:52 PM…

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IOB = Insulin On Board, or amount of active insulin in her body.

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It pains me that I have to tell her to set the alarm to wake up in the middle of a night on a sleepover! What other kid has to do it? But it’s her life.
So at this point we have a plan and I am trying to get some sleep. When I open my eyes an hour later and check Dexcom, I do not like what I see, so I text V again:

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IMG_E5952.jpgI’m fighting to stay awake while doing complicated diabetes math. We need to override the pump and give more insulin because she is so high. But I don’t want to send her plummeting to a low either, especially because she is not at home!

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All that careful math, and still… She went from 400 to 225 with two arrows down in 45 minutes. And now she has a lot of active insulin in her body. Time for opposite action!

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So now it is about 1 AM. I have been sleeping poorly in 45 min increments, waking up to glance at Dexcom and make sure V is OK. I’m hoping that finally we can get things stabilized. I get to close my eyes for a couple of hrs. Then I wake up to Dexcom high alarm at 3:38 AM.

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Clearly something is not working with the pump. Absorption issue? Bubbles in the cannula? Who knows? It’s not completely useless, it’s obviously delivering some insulin, or else V’s BG would keep climbing even higher and higher. What we do know is that an injection of insulin can do wonders to bring BG into a better range. What we also do know, from the prior few hours, is that the same amount of insulin administered by the pump has been fairly useless. Understandably, V is not at all thrilled about my preferred course of action.

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V – if you are reading this, please realize that when this happens at home, I get up and give you a shot. And then I also change your pod. Usually you sleep through most of it. It sucks but it needs to be done.

I do not hesitate to put on my mean Mom hat. Also, by now we’ve been texting for nearly half an hour, it’s almost 4 fucking AM, and I have neither patience nor energy.

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I know V is really tired, mad at me, and in extra bad mood because her BG is so high. But for the record, what I really want to do is to launch into a tirade of how dare she does not appreciate how much I do for her. In all caps. But I know better because really, it is so, so hard on her. She may not believe me but I get it. So I suck it up and let her vent, try to keep my cool, and make sure everything is taken care of.

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At this point we both crash. When I wake up in the morning and check Dexcom, she’s OK. Not great, but somewhere around 200. Good enough.

By the way, the other bane of my existence is cropping and editing 20 screenshots. But if it helps you understand what we sometimes have to go through, it’s all worth it.

#makediabetesvisible 

 

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Awareness, More Awareness…

Oh hi there! Come here often? I was totally shocked when I realized my last post was at the end of August. Has it really been that long? I guess I put a few things here and there on my FB page, but haven’t blogged in a while. November is Diabetes Awareness Month and in past years I’ve been blogging up a storm. This November I’ve stayed pretty quiet. I don’t have time or energy to post every day (or every month – HA!). I was not going to post anything today either but blogging material landed on my lap.

V’s diabeetus may have been feeling neglected, because just as World Diabetes Day got started on November 14th, diabeetus decided that we needed more awareness of it. To that end, Dexcom low alarm went off. And boom – one minute we are sleeping peacefully  and completely unaware, the other minute we are totally aware!

What a better way to mark Wold Diabetes Day than to battle lows in the middle of the night. (That was sarcasm.) Why was V’s BG so low? Diabeetus, that’s why.  According to all rules and logic it should not have happened. She went to bed at a solid 80 with no active insulin in her body and trend arrow holding nice and steady. She has walking pneumonia, which technically could have/should have raised her BG overnight, not lowered it. And in the past few days she’d been steadily going up overnight, even if she started with a good number before bed. We have not made any recent changes to her pump settings. We have not administered any insulin at bedtime. And yet, we had to pump her with four glucose tabs and suspend insulin delivery for an hour, and it took us about 3 hours to stabilize her BG and get it into a safe range.

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Over the course of 3 hrs alarms kept blaring. We kept getting up. V kept waking up. We poked her fingers multiple times. We could have given her more sugar right away but we did not want to over-treat and end up with an epic high, so we kept monitoring and doing it one step at a time. It was stressful and exhausting. Welcome to another night in our humble T1D adobe.

So why am I writing about this now, you may ask? Because I want to bring to light something that we don’t often talk about. What happened last night is great example of “shit happens, T1D edition.” People with diabetes have to face a lot of judgment. One reason for it is an assumption others often make that the person is doing something wrong: they are not eating well; not exercising enough or exercising too much; they are not following their doctor’s orders; they are not taking the correct amount of insulin. That surely there is a way to get BG under better control, to prevent most highs and lows, but the person is not making enough effort.*

Sure, there is always room for improvement and better glucose control. But what I want you to understand, really want you to understand, is that there are times when T1D makes absolutely no sense, follows no rules, and is completely unpredictable. Like last night, when it decided to act like a jerk, just because.

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The one thing I really want you to take away from this post on World Diabetes Day is that diabetes management has so many moving and unpredictable parts. Please don’t assume, never ever assume, that the person with diabetes or their caregiver are doing something wrong or not doing enough. And be prepared that if you ask me “why”, the only answer you may get is “diabeetus, that’s why.” Usually delivered with a shrug.

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*Disclaimer: People with Type 2 diabetes have it one hundred times worse when it comes to these types of judgments and assumptions. Sadly, sometimes it’s my fellow T1 peeps and parents who, in their defensive reactions of “I/my child did nothing to get T1D!”, throw fellow T2 brothers and sisters under the judgment bus. But that’s something to address in a separate post.

 

Diabetes Blog Week Monday: Diabetes and the Unexpected

It’s time for 8th annual Diabetes Blog Week! Thank you Karen of BitterSweet Diabetes for putting this together.

I need this #DBlogWeek badly. I haven’t been blogging much lately. I’ve been overwhelmed by various things in my life and blogging/social media presence/diabetes advocacy has taken a backseat. I am hoping that this week will provide an injection of fresh motivation and inspiration.

Today’s prompt is: Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens?  Or, take this topic another way and tell us about some good things diabetes has brought into your, or your loved one’s, life that you never could have expected?

The best way to prepare for the unexpected is to expect it. Ideally, you become clairvoyant and can accurately anticipate all future problems. In reality, we all learn from our mistakes. The main lesson I learned (or rather am continuously learning ) from my mistakes is to not leave without any supplies that we cannot do without for more than an hour, no matter where we are going, how close to home we will be, etc. We always carry extra supplies with us, except when I get stupid and forget about this rule. Like that day when I took V to her Endo appointment and didn’t bring her diabetes backpack. And of course her insulin pump’s pod failed there. Thankfully they were able to hook us up with an extra pod and a vial of insulin, though for a few minutes they worried that they ran out of spare pods. Or the time when I took V to a traveling swim meet 2 hrs away from home and decided to leave her Zofran behind. Because why all of a sudden would she get a stomach virus? Of course, she was hit with the worst stomach virus I’ve ever seen, and we were stuck overnight in a hotel room in the middle of nowhere, with V violently vomiting several times per hour, hardly able to keep any liquids down.  And the battery in the ketone meter was dead! We narrowly avoided a trip to the ER, only because I was able to find batteries for the ketone meter in a store nearby and my husband was able to drive to us and bring Zofran.

Cue our last vacation. I wrote earlier about the hassle of packing all diabetes stuff, or “diacrap”, as Rick aptly suggested in his comment. I packed enough pods for daily changes. Of course, who would expect that a pod would fail every day? They are supposed to last at least 2-3 days. Nevertheless, I was not taking any chances. Sure enough, we had to change a few pods in rapid succession. One day involved two pod changes in 3 hours.

The truly unexpected part? One of the pods could not handle all of the vacation excitement and fell apart. Like, literally. It was quite amazing. These things are bomb proof. They are sturdy, waterproof, designed for all kinds of abuse, and if anyone ever tried to break one apart to see what’s inside, they will testify that it is not a simple tasks. And yet, while the bottom part was still attached to V’s arm via adhesive, this happened…
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What on Earth caused this? We have no idea. We are sending this pod back to Insulet for them to examine and figure out. Perhaps it could not handle the excitement of the FlowRider?

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And here is a close-up of what a broken pod looks like. You are welcome 🙂

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Fully Loaded

The holidays are here and we are ready to eat all the things! Tomorrow we are having a Christmukah Eve potluck with our friends. Sunday we are having Christmas Day potluck with the same group of friends. Because why have one holiday meal if you can have two?

Last night we had company over for dinner, which gave us a good opportunity to do a dry run of holidays diabetes management. In line with how we handled Thanksgiving dinner last year, I decided to be aggressive with insulin and rely on Dexcom to monitor trends. I eyeballed the meal, overestimated the carb count, gave V a generous amount of insulin upfront, and spread out the other half of the dose over three hours. She wanted more dessert and we said yes, and gave more insulin. “Mom, do you realize I already have 11 units onboard?” “Yep. Give yourself more!”

All evening V’s BG stayed in the 130-180 range, which is fantastic. She gave herself some insulin before bed, which brought her into a nice low 100’s range for the duration of the night. It was a thing of beauty. This weekend’s goal: replicate this as closely as possible.

It was time to change V’s pod tonight. I was about to fill it with around 170 units of insulin, which normally lasts for 3 days with some extra to spare. Then I remembered about all the eating that will happen this weekend. For the very first time in three years of pumping, I loaded V’s pod with 200 units, filling it to the maximum capacity. Pod is fully loaded and we are ready!

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Wishing for good BG numbers this holiday weekend

 

 

Sound of silence

V asked to take a little break from Dexcom. Just for a day or two, she said, and then we’d put it back on. It’s been two weeks and counting. Sometimes you don’t realize how much something affects you until it’s no longer there. This break is helping me realize that I have a major case of alarm fatigue.

These two weeks have been so much quieter. No more daily high and low alerts. No more waking up in the middle of the night to false alarms. No more buzzing and beeping in the middle of various activities. Mind you, there are plenty of other beeps that keep our senses stimulated. The “Beep Beeeeep, Beep Beeeeep” of the pod, one hour after we change it or a few hours before it expires.  Or the “Click Click Click Click Click STAB!” sound of cannula insertion. Or the “SCREEEEEEEAAAAAAACHHHHHHHHHH” song of its people the pod sang to us when it failed this morning. But those are far less frequent noises compared to the daily onslaught of Dexcom alarms.

There have been times here and there I really missed our “Deckie.” V was not feeling well for a couple of days last week and I wished I had the data to better fine-tune her basal rates.  There were a couple of nights we had to get up in the middle of the night and test, instead of being able to glance at V’s BG on our phones. There were several times it would have been so much more convenient to dose by Dexcom instead of having to test. And there were a couple of times I would have treated high BG a lot more aggressively had I had Dexcom trend data to inform me of how BG was responding.

Despite mentioning here and there that she wanted to put Dexcom back on, V does not seem eager about it, and we are not pushing. Truth is, we are enjoying the sound of silence. In the meantime, we are finding value in going back to basics, staying in tune with V’s body, letting go of micromanaging BG, and using our spidey-sense to make dosing decisions. Tonight V woke up, got out of bed and came downstairs to tell me she felt really low. Indeed, she was 44. Perhaps we would have caught it much earlier with Dexcom, but we caught it anyway, treated, and back to sleep she went. A few days ago, she was 56 after intense swim practice. It would have been so much easier if we could see her BG trend on Dexcom. But V asked me if she could wait it out a little and not treat because she felt OK and because her BG often tends to shoot up after practice. I agreed. Sure enough, 15 minutes later she was 65, and settled on a solid number in lower 100’s within an hour.

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No Dexom? No problem. She scores 100 anyway!

This break won’t last forever. V’s middle school sleepover is approaching in a few weeks and at that time wearing Dexcom will not be negotiable. We will take it one day at a time.  And maybe there is room for a compromise? We could turn off all alerts altogether and use Dexcom solely for trend data. Or we could change low alert from 75 to 55, and high alert from 225 to 350, in order to not miss more serious lows or highs. Or perhaps my alarm fatigue will be diminished so much that I will be ready to go back to our old settings and put up with the alerts in exchange for easier and more precise BG management.

This time will come soon enough. Today, I am letting go.

 

 

Diabetes Awareness Month, Day 27

I am pleased to report that this year we nailed Thanksgiving. It started with turkey. For so many years we kept over-cooking it. This year, with the help of a good meat thermometer, a LOT of butter, and more accurate info on when to pull the bird out of the oven, we ended up with a perfectly moist turkey cooked to perfection – dark meat and white meat. Nothing was over cooked and only a minuscule part was slightly over-cooked. Success!

But more importantly, we must have dialed up just enough magic to figure out carbs and insulin. It was very timely that I saw this article on diabetes and thanksgiving  in the morning and immediately decided that I was going to use the tips. Because we are not afraid of insulin, no we are not!

At the heart of Scott’s strategy was this philosophy:

I have two steadfast rules about managing my daughter’s type 1 diabetes. Read them, memorize them, live by them.

1. It is far easier to stop a low or falling blood glucose then it is to return a high blood sugar to a safe range. In my experience most low or falling BGs can be stopped and steadied in a short amount of time, maybe 15 minutes. A high BG can take 3 to 5 hours to return to a safe place. I’ll say it again. It is easier to stop a fall or a low then it is to effect a high. This thought guides everything I do with insulin.

I can’t stress enough how much it resonated with me. And yet times and times again we’ve found ourselves acting way too cautiously, fearing lows, not using our CGM to keep better tabs on BG trends. NO MORE.

Last night I checked V over an hour before dinner and gave her a correction to bring her to a lower range. Then I looked at our menu and honestly calculated carbs. In fact, I decided to round up and assume that high-fat things will be metabolized as glucose, so that virtually nothing was carb-free. I did the math and decided that 100 g. was a good ball-park number.

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I gave V her dinner bolus at least 3o min before dinner. She got 30% of insulin upfront and 70% spread out over 2 hrs, so that there would be active insulin in her system when all the delayed carb absorption started to happen.

The results were amazing. V’s BG stayed relatively steady. At some point after dinner and dessert I noticed that CGM was saying 91 and going down, so I let her have a small piece of candy. We had no lows and her BG topped at a little under 180! For us it is quite remarkable. Things were OK overnight, too. I gave V a small correction bolus before bedtime, and even though BG climbed up a little overnight, it again topped at 188. Typically, we’d be battling 200’s and 300’s and it was great to see V stay in a much better range.

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Now, this is definitely something to be thankful for!

Diabetes Awareness Month, Day 22

Today I’m going to re-post one of my old posts again. This one is all about pumping.  If you’ve been wondering about insulin pumps, what they do, what they don’t do, what V’s pump looks like, and how it works, this post is for you.

I am going to throw in a bonus photo. V had a swim meet today. I was helping with timing and it just so happened that she was in my lane. So I got a rare opportunity to be right next to her before start and snapped this photo, with her pump pod front and center.

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