Diabetes Blog Week Friday: More Than Diabetes

Today’s prompt is:
Lets wrap up the week by sharing a little more about ourselves, beyond the chronic illness we or our loved ones live with.  Share an interest, hobby, passion, something that is YOU.  If you want to explore how it relates to or helps with diabetes you can.   Or let it be a part of you that is completely separate from diabetes, because there is more to life than just diabetes!  

I love this topic! Screw diabetes. Instead, let’s talk about unrelated fun stuff and post gratuitous photos. Without further ado, here are some random facts about me and my T1d and gluten-free crew.

I’m a runner. I’m a very slow runner but I don’t care. I started running in 2009 and to my own amazement it became my hobby and my passion. I don’t know how I used to cope with life before I started running. So far I’ve completed 4 full marathons and 13 half marathons. I have no idea what my next race will be or when, but I’m sure it will happen sooner than later.

 

I love the ocean. I love being near, around, or in the ocean. I does not get old. When I was growing up, it was my dream to live by the ocean and now I’m living my dream. It’s also one of the reasons I love cruising. My favorite thing to do is sit on the balcony as we are sailing on the open ocean. It’s the best thing ever.

 

These two faces! We have the best doggies ever and we love them fiercely.

 

I love Start Trek TNG. Yes, Trekkie all the way. Shockingly, I don’t care about or watched Star Wars. I am probably the only person on Earth, I know. Don’t hate me, OK?

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Love this quote!

 

Last but not least, I’ll leave you with our recent family picture. Taken on a cruise, of course 🙂

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This concludes 2017 Diabetes Blog Week. I have lots of catching up to do and can’t wait to read more posts over the weekend.

Quiet before the sail

We leave on our big vacation in one week. First we fly across the country to spend a couple of days with family, then we board the cruise ship. This will be our second cruise with T1D. We know the drill. And yet I’m starting to lose my shit a little bit as we are preparing ALL the things.

V had her regular Endo appointment last month where we discussed cruise BG management strategies. Endo made suggestions re: some dosage adjustments. But her main recommendation for V was to remain active. Last cruise was 5 days long and she spent the majority of it running high. She felt it and it was not pleasant. We could let it go for 5 days, but this upcoming cruise is 9 days. Running high for 9 days straight is not going to work. We’ve been talking about being more reasonable with food, being even more aggressive with insulin, and about the added importance of moving around. We’ll have to take walks around the ship. There are other fun active things to do onboard and there are more choices than on our last cruise. And we’ll get off the ship a few times to go to beaches and snorkel. This time it has to be different.

Then there is so much stuff to pack. So.much.stuff. I generally love trip planning but packing all the  medical crap is the bane of my existence. We will be in the middle of nowhere for 9 days and I feel like there is no room for error. I’m making a list and checking it twice. The Insulet rep gave us a loaner PDM (pump’s remote) to take with us as a back up in case V’s fails. How many pods to bring? I’m thinking at least 10. No, I’ll feel more comfortable with 14. Two or three vials of insulin for the pump plus a vial of back-up long-acting insulin. Syringes, strips, meters… Do we have any unexpired ketone strips? Must check. Glucagon! How many? I’m thinking at least two? Because you never know and I do not want to take any chances. AAA batteries. Dexcom sensors and charger. Wipes galore. And so much more. I’m half-panicking that we will forget something important or not bring enough of it. Yes there is an infirmary on the ship. No I don’t want to rely on it for anything because I have no idea if they have anything we need. WHAT IF WE FORGET SOMETHING IMPORTANT?!?!?

OK, breathe. Breathe. We got this. Need to bring some snacks for air travel and shore excursions. Also need to pack gels and glucose tabs. At least there will be easy 24 hr access to food/juice. And there are plenty of gluten-free eats on the ship.

Trip insurance was purchased long ago. In fact, it was purchased within two weeks of booking the cruise so that we could get a waiver for pre-existing conditions. With three out of four in the family living with chronic health conditions, there is no way in hell we are going on a trip without trip insurance. Have to remember to print out insurance paperwork. Should probably print out a travel letter from Endo? Though we’ve never needed it before so maybe not…

And then there are other meds and equipment including a nebulizer (because F U asthma and you never know…) Have a duffle bag that will be dedicated to medical supplies. Bought more luggage tags. Need to put tags on V’s diabetes backpack and the duffle bag and clearly label them as medical supplies. Need to make sure all devices are properly labeled.

So.much.stuff.

We got this. I am going to overpack like we are going away for a month but I will leave knowing that we have everything V needs to have a fun and safe vacation. Soon we will be back on the high seas having a time of our lives. All this prep is worth it.

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Gluten-Free Expo Review

Disclosure: The Gluten-Free Media Group provided me with a complimentary admission to Gluten-Free Expo. All opinions are my own.

Gluten-Free expo was amazing. So many different products to explore! I was quite familiar with some products and approached those vendors as a true fangirl. And there were many more that were either new to me or that I have not had a chance to sample in the past.

All the swag! All the vendors!

Without further ado, I present to you some of my favorites.

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Everything by BFree. Like, everything. Breads, bagels, pita bread (yes, GF pita bread exists), breadsticks – everything is so good! I’ve heard of the brand before but this was my first time sampling it. A+

 

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These things are like crack. Seriously, you can’t eat just one. Very tasty and make great appetizers/party food.

 

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So many yummy things by this company that was completely new to me. See that chocolate cake mix? Tried it. Tastes amazing.

 

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So Delicious is so delicious. Also so blurry, sorry. Why yogurt, you ask? Isn’t yogurt normally GF anyway? Well, yes. I loved this for my own selfish reason. In my early twenties I developed mild lactose tolerance. A few years ago it got worse. Thank goodness I can still have cheese and most processed dairy products, as well as just a little bit of milk/cream. But I had to say good bye to yogurts and ice cream altogether, because doubling over in pain is so not worth it. So Delicious makes yummy coconut milk based yogurts and ice-creams. Trust me, I tried many and it’s not that easy to pull it off.

 

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Using the swag I brought back, I assembled V’s lunch later that day: a sandwich with BFree bread roll, So Delicious yogurt, and sun butter.

 

The following day I decided to bring V along. It felt great to be able to tell her that she could eat everything. How often does that happen? Almost never.

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Some of V’s favorites were Sun Butter and Milton’s chips. Yum!

So it’s lovely when everything is GF and I could say yes to everything. Except that stupid diabetes thing that did not agree with all of the sampling V had. We tried to estimate carbs best we could but ended up severely underestimating.

 

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Oops! We fixed it, using mainly insulin. For bonus points tell me at what time we arrived to the Expo? How were you able to tell?

 

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V was excited to assemble her lunch for the following day, using some of her favorite products.

 

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Last but not least, we got to try Keli’s Sauces. Sweet N Sour sauce was hands-down favorite. Not only is it delicious, it’s also pretty low in carbs, at 5 g per 1 TBS. V dips everything into it. It’s taken an honorable place alongside ketchup and it’s a place hard-earned.

I can’t wait to go to the Expo next year and if I’m lucky I’ll make it to other Expos. I highly recommend you do the same. If you go, I have a pro tip for you: go hungry or else you won’t be able to get through even a fraction of samples. Also,  you may not need another meal that day. Or ever.

Gluten-Free Expo, At Last!

And I’m doing my first ever giveaway! Just keep reading 🙂

I’ve heard about various gluten-free expos. I’ve read other peoples’ experiences about attending. I was ware that there was at least one big expo right here were we live. I’ve been wanting to go for-freaking-ever, but something always came up. Not any more. Move over diabetes, I’m giving Celiac some well-deserved time in the spotlight.

Because really, sometimes Celiac is even more annoying than Diabetes. Yes, really. For example, V was going on a field trip to the ice-skating rink with her class a few weeks ago. Afterwards they were going to have pizza and snacks. My very first question was, could they get GF pizza for her? Because if they could not, V would have to bring her own lunch. Not fun. And traveling while maintaining a gluten-free diet can present another set of challenges. For starters, wherever we go, we have to stay in a place that has at least a fridge and microwave, so that we can either bring food with us or buy it at a store. Finding a restaurant with gluten-free options is not always possible, so we always have to be prepared to supply V’s food on our own.

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No trip to Target is complete without stocking up on some of our GF favorites

Random fun fact #1: when we find some gluten-free products on sale, we buy them up in ridiculous quantities. Like this:

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When our favorite GF bread is on sale…

 

Anyway, I’m really excited to finally attend a Gluten-Free expo here in San Diego on February 12-13. (Random fun fact #2: Gluten Free Media Group – the company that puts together the expos – is also the same company that’s behind Find Me Gluten Free app and website. This app is a life-saver for us when we are traveling and I’ve found amazing GF restaurants with its help.)

While I know of many GF products, there are many more that I’m not aware of, and I can’t wait to explore the wonderful GF world at the expo. I am going to be  on a particular lookout for products that are GF AND diabetes-friendly. I’m also hoping to discover more local restaurants, stores, and other businesses that cater to Celiac community. And perhaps I can learn something new about GF living.

Want to join me at the expo? I have….DRUMROLL….a GIVEAWAY!

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I have five tickets that are good for FREE admission to one day of the event (Saturday 2/11 or Sunday 2/12). Comment on this post by Saturday 1/14/17 telling me what your favorite gluten-free product is and why you love it so. I will select five people randomly on Sunday 1/15/17. 

 

 

Fully Loaded

The holidays are here and we are ready to eat all the things! Tomorrow we are having a Christmukah Eve potluck with our friends. Sunday we are having Christmas Day potluck with the same group of friends. Because why have one holiday meal if you can have two?

Last night we had company over for dinner, which gave us a good opportunity to do a dry run of holidays diabetes management. In line with how we handled Thanksgiving dinner last year, I decided to be aggressive with insulin and rely on Dexcom to monitor trends. I eyeballed the meal, overestimated the carb count, gave V a generous amount of insulin upfront, and spread out the other half of the dose over three hours. She wanted more dessert and we said yes, and gave more insulin. “Mom, do you realize I already have 11 units onboard?” “Yep. Give yourself more!”

All evening V’s BG stayed in the 130-180 range, which is fantastic. She gave herself some insulin before bed, which brought her into a nice low 100’s range for the duration of the night. It was a thing of beauty. This weekend’s goal: replicate this as closely as possible.

It was time to change V’s pod tonight. I was about to fill it with around 170 units of insulin, which normally lasts for 3 days with some extra to spare. Then I remembered about all the eating that will happen this weekend. For the very first time in three years of pumping, I loaded V’s pod with 200 units, filling it to the maximum capacity. Pod is fully loaded and we are ready!

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Wishing for good BG numbers this holiday weekend

 

 

ROIT1D 3 of 3

Early in the year, I made a commitment to run three half-marathons and fundraise for Riding on Insulin. I wrote about it herehere and here.

On November 12th I fulfilled my racing and fundraising commitments by completing my third half-marathon and reaching my fundraising minimum.

This was one of my favorite races. It was extremely well-organized and the course was absolutely gorgeous. Even though it was mostly downhill, I did not set a PR (Personal Record). Because, well, true to my running hat, I run like the winded. But it meant so much to me to complete it and have my family celebrate with me at the end. This one was for V and for all other T1Ds who live their lives fully and don’t allow diabetes to stop them from doing what they love.

Thank you ROI for providing inspiration for me and our entire family!

A Letter of Hope

I am going to kick off November – Diabetes Awareness Month – with a letter of hope. It’s a brilliant idea of Maureen at Mumoftype1 to include these letters in hospital care packages for families of newly diagnosed T1 kids.

Dear family of a newly diagnosed child:

It’s undoubtedly a really hard time for you now. Your world has been turned upside down. You may be feeling scared, overwhelmed, sad, frustrated. You are probably bombarded with so much information and wondering how on earth you’ll be able to remember half of it, let alone be able to do all the things you need to do to take care of your child.

I remember this time so well. Like many other families, diabetes was the last thing on our mind and, in fact, we had no idea what Type 1 Diabetes was. I remember how, in the first days after diagnosis, I was wishing that we could fast-forward a year, to a point where we would not feel so overwhelmed, where we knew what we were doing and at peace with our new normal.

Now that we are more that three years in, I am going to tell you this: it will get better. I promise. It is a steep learning curve but before you know it, you will learn and do so much. You will become the boss of diabetes!

As much as you  can, embrace the hand you’ve been dealt. Dive in and learn. Ask questions, do your research. Learn together with your child. The more you understand about diabetes and its management, the more empowered and confident you will feel, and it will trickle down to your T1 child and the rest of the family. By now I feel like I’ve earned my honorary endocrinology degree and our daughter earned a title of a true diabadass. We have both skills and confidence to handle any situation diabetes can throw at us and it gives us a peace of mind and a feeling of pride and accomplishment.

Diabetes does not stop our daughter from doing what she loves. Be it sports, or playdates, or camps, or sleepovers, or traveling – she continues to do it all. You will learn how to make necessary adjustments, get the right kind of support and ask for appropriate accommodations. The question is not whether your child can do something with diabetes, but how it can be done. If there is one thing that I want to convey in this letter, is that you will learn how to work diabetes management around your life, not the other way around. It’s not always simple and there will be many hurdles to overcome, but I encourage you to start thinking about this right away. We don’t have a choice about having diabetes in our children’s lives, but we have a choice of how to deal with it and how to make the best of it. 

So, welcome to this crappy elite club. Did I mention that this club is full of amazing people? Please reach out to other T1 families in your community and online. Your local JDRF chapter is a good place to start. Our fellow d-peeps are an incredible source of support, encouragement, and wisdom. Our daughter also benefits immensely from having other T1 friends in her life.

Hang in there. Trust yourself and trust your child. T1 kids and families are strong and resilient. You got this. And all of us here got your back. You may not know us but we are in your corner. You are not alone!

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