Good to go

In the past, new situations would require a more detailed explanation of T1D. My daughter has type 1 diabetes. “Here is what you should be aware of; here is what to do if she is high or low; here are the supplies; here is how to use glucagon; here is what she may need help with.”

Now that V is fully capable of handling all aspects of her diabetes care, things are different. One week before babysitting camp, I tried emailing who I thought was the right contact  to give them a heads up about V. I never got a reply and things got too busy for me to follow up. So on the day of drop off, I introduced myself to camp counselor and said this: “Just so you are aware, V has type 1 diabetes. She has all of the supplies with her and she knows what to do, she is completely independent in her care. She has her phone on her, she needs to keep it to call us if she has any questions or needs help. Please feel free to call us if you have any questions or concerns. Otherwise, she’s good to go.” The counselor asked if V had snacks for low blood sugar and I assured her that she had plenty. And that was that.

Today was back to school day. I prepared V’s supplies for health office. I like to take a minimalist approach, pack only the necessities, and refill as needed. As she is flying mostly solo, she only visits the health office if she’s unwell or runs out of supplies unexpectedly, and she always carries a glucagon and glucose tabs in her backpack.

Back up supplies, snacks and fast acting sugars will do. All fits in a relatively small box. Not pictured are a vial of back up insulin, string cheese and a couple of back up frozen gluten free meals, that go straight from our fridge/freezer to the one in health office. No letter, no flow charts, no detailed explanations.

When we arrived to school, we learned that there was a new nurse. I found her by the front gate, introduced myself and asked her where to drop off supplies. “I am V’s mom. She has type one diabetes and celiac. She’s completely independent in her care.” The nurse asked me if V was “the one with the pump” and told me she’s heard great things about her. And that a wonderful health tech who was there last year is going be there every day except Monday. Alright, this makes for a good start! I told her I’ll have V drop by and introduce herself at some point.

And that was that.

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Off to 7th and 4th grades they go. One is fake smiling. The other one is completely honest about his lack of enthusiasm. 

P.S. After V reads this post, I’m sure she can comment on how annoyed she was with the school not informing the new math teacher about her T1D, and her having to spend 10-15 minutes explaining it to her. She can also tell you how stupid diabeetus completely refused to cooperate and she fought highs all day long for no good reason. And we can also talk about our ongoing struggle of getting V to wake up to CGM alarms in the middle of the night, as it makes sleepovers more challenging.

But aside from that, she knows what to do. She’s good to go.

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Most-wanted gadget

V’s annual Celiac blood panel was done recently, and results are not great. Four years after diagnosis and her antibodies are still positive. Worse yet, the numbers crept up a little from last year. Last year things were heading in the right direction and her doctor was hopeful that with this blood work result everything would be in the negative. Not the case.

I’m really frustrated. What are we doing wrong? Obviously somewhere, somehow, V gets exposed to gluten. But where? Is there cross-contamination at home? We are not 100% gluten-free. We keep regular bread and bagels, cereal, some pre-packaged snacks, and that’s about it. All meals we make are gluten-free. We are extremely careful about cross-contamination. We have a dedicated toaster oven and a cutting board. But perhaps it’s not enough and we need to go completely gluten-free at home?

Or is the problem with restaurants where we eat? Once again, we found a few that we consider safe. However, because V does not typically have any reaction to gluten that she can feel or we can see, we have no way of telling if what she is eating is actually safe.

Or perhaps the issue was during the cruise, where getting a safe gluten-free meal proved to be rather a frustrating challenge? Since we did the blood work shortly after we returned, it may be reflective of possible cross-contamination there?

How I would love to know for sure. And guess what? There is actually a gadget out there that could help us. Nima Sensor will analyze a food sample and tell you if it contains any gluten. If we bite the bullet and go 100% gluten-free at home, we can test food at restaurants and maybe finally track down the source of cross-contamination.

There is one little glitch. The price of Nima Sensor is a cool $275. And that’s just for a starter kit. Since each food sample requires a new capsule, those will run you more. The website recommends a subscription of 12 capsules per month at a cool price of $60 per month. If we don’t do subscription, we have to pony up $72 for 12 capsules. Those capsules will go quickly if we want to test V’s meals when we dine out, even though we don’t normally eat out more than once a week.

So here I am, staring at this cool gadget, really wanting it. But it is simply too expensive.

What do we do? I have no idea. If you are reading this post and you have Celiac, I’d love for you to weigh in. I’m also curious if it’s a reasonable expectation for tests to be negative. It is really possible? Would you eat a product that, according to the label, was made on equipment shared with wheat, or is that a no-no? What about a product that is made in a facility that also processes wheat? It is unreasonable for us to think that we can live a normal life where we don’t wrap V in a bubble, allow her to eat at places other than home, and don’t have to be on edge about everything she puts in her mouth?

We are going back to the GI doctor later in the summer to discuss all this. Perhaps we can squeeze in another round of blood work just to rule out vacation cross-contamination. Aside from that, I’m at a loss.

As safe as it gets: samples that we got at the Gluten-Free Expo

 

Diabetes Blog Week Throwback Thursday: What Brings Me Down

Today’s Prompt: Today let’s revisit a prompt from 2014 – May is Mental Health Month so now seems like a great time to explore the emotional side of living with, or caring for someone with, diabetes. What things can make dealing with diabetes an emotional issue for you and / or your loved one, and how do you cope?

I asked V what brings her down about living with diabetes. Without skipping a beat she said “Low blood sugar brings me down.” She’s a wiseass. Wonder who she takes after?
I asked her to give it some more thought. “Think about it. What gives you the sads?” After mulling it over, she said “When I can’t eat when my BG is high. My life revolves around food, so it gives me the sads.” And then she happily scampered away.

Perhaps it’s no use asking a 12-year-old what brings her down about living with diabetes when it’s the last thing on her mind. And to her credit often she does this whole T1D thing way better than us, adults. She’ll wonder from time to time how much easier life would be without diabetes. She’ll get annoyed and frustrated about having to deal with the hassle of it. A bad high will add a generous portion of extra upset and anger when she is already upset and angry. A bad low will make her feel really lousy. Sometimes there will be a painful pod or Dexcom change. But she keeps moving along and happily living her life. How I hope that it stays this way.

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I hope she keeps this joy forever and ever

As to what brings me down? I don’t go there too often. I stay away from “what ifs”, take things in stride, and laugh at diabetes whenever I have a chance. When I do go there, it’s not so much down as worried. Worried about bad lows and future complications. Worried about V giving up on her diabetes care as she navigates adolescence. Worried about V being able to maintain good health insurance and access to healthcare when she becomes an adult. Worried about her quality of life with diabetes.

It’s not so much down as defeated. Defeated when we do everything right and still don’t get desired results. Defeated when we can’t put a dent into our credit card debt because medical expenses are relentless. Defeated when that stubborn high BG won’t come down no matter how aggressively we treat it. Defeated when we work so hard to tighten control but the A1C won’t move anywhere but up.

It’s not so much down as angry. Angry every time I hear about a cure in mice. Angry about so much ignorance and misinformation about diabetes. Angry about diabetes and diabetics being the butt of everyone’s jokes. Angry about judgment and hate.

It’s not so much down as exhausted. Exhausted after being up at night because of V’s highs or lows. Exhausted from fighting with insurance. Exhausted from having to shlep to so many doctor’s appointments. Exhausted from having to think about diabetes 24/7.

While V is young, I carry these emotions for her. It is my job as a parent to lessen her burden and I do it gladly. But I can’t do it forever. It is her diabetes and eventually, sooner rather than later, all these burdens that come with it will become hers. It is the one thing that really brings me down. 

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My really pathetic attempt at whipped cream art, created on one of V’s diaversaries. The message spells “T1D Sucks”. Because it does.

 

Diabetes Blog Week Wednesday: The Blame Game

Today’s Prompts is: Having diabetes often makes a visit to the doctor a dreaded experience, as there is invariably bad news of one kind or another.  And sometimes the way the doctor talks to you can leave you feeling like you’re at fault.  Or maybe you have a fantastic healthcare team, but have experienced blame and judgement from someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger.  Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had.  Now, the game part.  Let’s turn this around.  If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself?   Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us!

I’m pleased to say that we are very fortunate. We have a fantastic healthcare team and are surrounded by supportive friends, family and local T1D community. The only one really bad experience we had was at the water park last summer, when V was rudely confronted by a stranger who felt she was cutting the line and, since she did not look sick, did not have any reasons to have a disability pass. I wrote about it in detail in this post.  To be honest, I really don’t feel like revisiting it. When someone passes judgment inadvertently because of misinformation, but without an intent to be hurtful, I am more than happy to have a discussion. But there is no reasoning with a jerk and, aside from standing up to them, I’m not going to waste my time and energy with someone who has no desire to be supportive.

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I can, however, offer a few advanced tips to those who have to deal with us, crazy D-parents and our T1D offspring.

-Instead of asking “How is V’s diabetes?”,  ask “How is V doing with her diabetes?” When asked the former, my knew-jerk response is “Eh, it’s still there.” But even if I’m not trying to be a wiseass (hard to believe, I know), I don’t know how to answer this question. When you ask me how V is doing, I can give you an honest and specific answer. Often it’s “She has good days and bad days.” But sometimes I can share that we’ve hit a sweet spot and things have been relatively uneventful. Or that V is really struggling at the moment.

-Please don’t tell us that you “could never do it” – give shots, or count carbs, or poke fingers multiple times. If you life depended on it you would. Instead, you can say “All this sounds painful and scary and overwhelming.” And personally I take zero offense if you say that you are grateful your kids are healthy and don’t have to deal with any of this crap. No, seriously – feeling bad for us does not preclude you from feeling grateful that you don’t have to go through what we are going through. Trust me, we would not wish it on anyone.

-When V tells you she hates immunization shots, please don’t say in a very surprised tone “But shouldn’t you be used to shots by now?” First of all, have you seen a diabetes syringe? The needle is tiny and the shots are usually painless or sting just a bit. Now, compare it to a needle that is used for immunization shots. It’s a monster in comparison. Secondly, pump and CGM insertions involve needles too. They may not always be visible but they are bigger and they hurt. So the last thing V needs in her life is another shot. You can say just that.

-Last but not least, when you hear about another “breakthrough” or exciting discovery/tech development in the news, please curb your enthusiasm.

 

Gluten-Free Expo Review

Disclosure: The Gluten-Free Media Group provided me with a complimentary admission to Gluten-Free Expo. All opinions are my own.

Gluten-Free expo was amazing. So many different products to explore! I was quite familiar with some products and approached those vendors as a true fangirl. And there were many more that were either new to me or that I have not had a chance to sample in the past.

All the swag! All the vendors!

Without further ado, I present to you some of my favorites.

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Everything by BFree. Like, everything. Breads, bagels, pita bread (yes, GF pita bread exists), breadsticks – everything is so good! I’ve heard of the brand before but this was my first time sampling it. A+

 

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These things are like crack. Seriously, you can’t eat just one. Very tasty and make great appetizers/party food.

 

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So many yummy things by this company that was completely new to me. See that chocolate cake mix? Tried it. Tastes amazing.

 

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So Delicious is so delicious. Also so blurry, sorry. Why yogurt, you ask? Isn’t yogurt normally GF anyway? Well, yes. I loved this for my own selfish reason. In my early twenties I developed mild lactose tolerance. A few years ago it got worse. Thank goodness I can still have cheese and most processed dairy products, as well as just a little bit of milk/cream. But I had to say good bye to yogurts and ice cream altogether, because doubling over in pain is so not worth it. So Delicious makes yummy coconut milk based yogurts and ice-creams. Trust me, I tried many and it’s not that easy to pull it off.

 

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Using the swag I brought back, I assembled V’s lunch later that day: a sandwich with BFree bread roll, So Delicious yogurt, and sun butter.

 

The following day I decided to bring V along. It felt great to be able to tell her that she could eat everything. How often does that happen? Almost never.

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Some of V’s favorites were Sun Butter and Milton’s chips. Yum!

So it’s lovely when everything is GF and I could say yes to everything. Except that stupid diabetes thing that did not agree with all of the sampling V had. We tried to estimate carbs best we could but ended up severely underestimating.

 

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Oops! We fixed it, using mainly insulin. For bonus points tell me at what time we arrived to the Expo? How were you able to tell?

 

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V was excited to assemble her lunch for the following day, using some of her favorite products.

 

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Last but not least, we got to try Keli’s Sauces. Sweet N Sour sauce was hands-down favorite. Not only is it delicious, it’s also pretty low in carbs, at 5 g per 1 TBS. V dips everything into it. It’s taken an honorable place alongside ketchup and it’s a place hard-earned.

I can’t wait to go to the Expo next year and if I’m lucky I’ll make it to other Expos. I highly recommend you do the same. If you go, I have a pro tip for you: go hungry or else you won’t be able to get through even a fraction of samples. Also,  you may not need another meal that day. Or ever.

Gluten-Free Expo, At Last!

And I’m doing my first ever giveaway! Just keep reading 🙂

I’ve heard about various gluten-free expos. I’ve read other peoples’ experiences about attending. I was ware that there was at least one big expo right here were we live. I’ve been wanting to go for-freaking-ever, but something always came up. Not any more. Move over diabetes, I’m giving Celiac some well-deserved time in the spotlight.

Because really, sometimes Celiac is even more annoying than Diabetes. Yes, really. For example, V was going on a field trip to the ice-skating rink with her class a few weeks ago. Afterwards they were going to have pizza and snacks. My very first question was, could they get GF pizza for her? Because if they could not, V would have to bring her own lunch. Not fun. And traveling while maintaining a gluten-free diet can present another set of challenges. For starters, wherever we go, we have to stay in a place that has at least a fridge and microwave, so that we can either bring food with us or buy it at a store. Finding a restaurant with gluten-free options is not always possible, so we always have to be prepared to supply V’s food on our own.

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No trip to Target is complete without stocking up on some of our GF favorites

Random fun fact #1: when we find some gluten-free products on sale, we buy them up in ridiculous quantities. Like this:

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When our favorite GF bread is on sale…

 

Anyway, I’m really excited to finally attend a Gluten-Free expo here in San Diego on February 12-13. (Random fun fact #2: Gluten Free Media Group – the company that puts together the expos – is also the same company that’s behind Find Me Gluten Free app and website. This app is a life-saver for us when we are traveling and I’ve found amazing GF restaurants with its help.)

While I know of many GF products, there are many more that I’m not aware of, and I can’t wait to explore the wonderful GF world at the expo. I am going to be  on a particular lookout for products that are GF AND diabetes-friendly. I’m also hoping to discover more local restaurants, stores, and other businesses that cater to Celiac community. And perhaps I can learn something new about GF living.

Want to join me at the expo? I have….DRUMROLL….a GIVEAWAY!

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I have five tickets that are good for FREE admission to one day of the event (Saturday 2/11 or Sunday 2/12). Comment on this post by Saturday 1/14/17 telling me what your favorite gluten-free product is and why you love it so. I will select five people randomly on Sunday 1/15/17. 

 

 

Fully Loaded

The holidays are here and we are ready to eat all the things! Tomorrow we are having a Christmukah Eve potluck with our friends. Sunday we are having Christmas Day potluck with the same group of friends. Because why have one holiday meal if you can have two?

Last night we had company over for dinner, which gave us a good opportunity to do a dry run of holidays diabetes management. In line with how we handled Thanksgiving dinner last year, I decided to be aggressive with insulin and rely on Dexcom to monitor trends. I eyeballed the meal, overestimated the carb count, gave V a generous amount of insulin upfront, and spread out the other half of the dose over three hours. She wanted more dessert and we said yes, and gave more insulin. “Mom, do you realize I already have 11 units onboard?” “Yep. Give yourself more!”

All evening V’s BG stayed in the 130-180 range, which is fantastic. She gave herself some insulin before bed, which brought her into a nice low 100’s range for the duration of the night. It was a thing of beauty. This weekend’s goal: replicate this as closely as possible.

It was time to change V’s pod tonight. I was about to fill it with around 170 units of insulin, which normally lasts for 3 days with some extra to spare. Then I remembered about all the eating that will happen this weekend. For the very first time in three years of pumping, I loaded V’s pod with 200 units, filling it to the maximum capacity. Pod is fully loaded and we are ready!

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Wishing for good BG numbers this holiday weekend