Gluten-Free Expo Review

Disclosure: The Gluten-Free Media Group provided me with a complimentary admission to Gluten-Free Expo. All opinions are my own.

Gluten-Free expo was amazing. So many different products to explore! I was quite familiar with some products and approached those vendors as a true fangirl. And there were many more that were either new to me or that I have not had a chance to sample in the past.

All the swag! All the vendors!

Without further ado, I present to you some of my favorites.

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Everything by BFree. Like, everything. Breads, bagels, pita bread (yes, GF pita bread exists), breadsticks – everything is so good! I’ve heard of the brand before but this was my first time sampling it. A+

 

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These things are like crack. Seriously, you can’t eat just one. Very tasty and make great appetizers/party food.

 

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So many yummy things by this company that was completely new to me. See that chocolate cake mix? Tried it. Tastes amazing.

 

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So Delicious is so delicious. Also so blurry, sorry. Why yogurt, you ask? Isn’t yogurt normally GF anyway? Well, yes. I loved this for my own selfish reason. In my early twenties I developed mild lactose tolerance. A few years ago it got worse. Thank goodness I can still have cheese and most processed dairy products, as well as just a little bit of milk/cream. But I had to say good bye to yogurts and ice cream altogether, because doubling over in pain is so not worth it. So Delicious makes yummy coconut milk based yogurts and ice-creams. Trust me, I tried many and it’s not that easy to pull it off.

 

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Using the swag I brought back, I assembled V’s lunch later that day: a sandwich with BFree bread roll, So Delicious yogurt, and sun butter.

 

The following day I decided to bring V along. It felt great to be able to tell her that she could eat everything. How often does that happen? Almost never.

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Some of V’s favorites were Sun Butter and Milton’s chips. Yum!

So it’s lovely when everything is GF and I could say yes to everything. Except that stupid diabetes thing that did not agree with all of the sampling V had. We tried to estimate carbs best we could but ended up severely underestimating.

 

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Oops! We fixed it, using mainly insulin. For bonus points tell me at what time we arrived to the Expo? How were you able to tell?

 

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V was excited to assemble her lunch for the following day, using some of her favorite products.

 

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Last but not least, we got to try Keli’s Sauces. Sweet N Sour sauce was hands-down favorite. Not only is it delicious, it’s also pretty low in carbs, at 5 g per 1 TBS. V dips everything into it. It’s taken an honorable place alongside ketchup and it’s a place hard-earned.

I can’t wait to go to the Expo next year and if I’m lucky I’ll make it to other Expos. I highly recommend you do the same. If you go, I have a pro tip for you: go hungry or else you won’t be able to get through even a fraction of samples. Also,  you may not need another meal that day. Or ever.

Gluten-Free Expo, At Last!

And I’m doing my first ever giveaway! Just keep reading 🙂

I’ve heard about various gluten-free expos. I’ve read other peoples’ experiences about attending. I was ware that there was at least one big expo right here were we live. I’ve been wanting to go for-freaking-ever, but something always came up. Not any more. Move over diabetes, I’m giving Celiac some well-deserved time in the spotlight.

Because really, sometimes Celiac is even more annoying than Diabetes. Yes, really. For example, V was going on a field trip to the ice-skating rink with her class a few weeks ago. Afterwards they were going to have pizza and snacks. My very first question was, could they get GF pizza for her? Because if they could not, V would have to bring her own lunch. Not fun. And traveling while maintaining a gluten-free diet can present another set of challenges. For starters, wherever we go, we have to stay in a place that has at least a fridge and microwave, so that we can either bring food with us or buy it at a store. Finding a restaurant with gluten-free options is not always possible, so we always have to be prepared to supply V’s food on our own.

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No trip to Target is complete without stocking up on some of our GF favorites

Random fun fact #1: when we find some gluten-free products on sale, we buy them up in ridiculous quantities. Like this:

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When our favorite GF bread is on sale…

 

Anyway, I’m really excited to finally attend a Gluten-Free expo here in San Diego on February 12-13. (Random fun fact #2: Gluten Free Media Group – the company that puts together the expos – is also the same company that’s behind Find Me Gluten Free app and website. This app is a life-saver for us when we are traveling and I’ve found amazing GF restaurants with its help.)

While I know of many GF products, there are many more that I’m not aware of, and I can’t wait to explore the wonderful GF world at the expo. I am going to be  on a particular lookout for products that are GF AND diabetes-friendly. I’m also hoping to discover more local restaurants, stores, and other businesses that cater to Celiac community. And perhaps I can learn something new about GF living.

Want to join me at the expo? I have….DRUMROLL….a GIVEAWAY!

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I have five tickets that are good for FREE admission to one day of the event (Saturday 2/11 or Sunday 2/12). Comment on this post by Saturday 1/14/17 telling me what your favorite gluten-free product is and why you love it so. I will select five people randomly on Sunday 1/15/17. 

 

 

Fully Loaded

The holidays are here and we are ready to eat all the things! Tomorrow we are having a Christmukah Eve potluck with our friends. Sunday we are having Christmas Day potluck with the same group of friends. Because why have one holiday meal if you can have two?

Last night we had company over for dinner, which gave us a good opportunity to do a dry run of holidays diabetes management. In line with how we handled Thanksgiving dinner last year, I decided to be aggressive with insulin and rely on Dexcom to monitor trends. I eyeballed the meal, overestimated the carb count, gave V a generous amount of insulin upfront, and spread out the other half of the dose over three hours. She wanted more dessert and we said yes, and gave more insulin. “Mom, do you realize I already have 11 units onboard?” “Yep. Give yourself more!”

All evening V’s BG stayed in the 130-180 range, which is fantastic. She gave herself some insulin before bed, which brought her into a nice low 100’s range for the duration of the night. It was a thing of beauty. This weekend’s goal: replicate this as closely as possible.

It was time to change V’s pod tonight. I was about to fill it with around 170 units of insulin, which normally lasts for 3 days with some extra to spare. Then I remembered about all the eating that will happen this weekend. For the very first time in three years of pumping, I loaded V’s pod with 200 units, filling it to the maximum capacity. Pod is fully loaded and we are ready!

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Wishing for good BG numbers this holiday weekend

 

 

A Letter of Hope

I am going to kick off November – Diabetes Awareness Month – with a letter of hope. It’s a brilliant idea of Maureen at Mumoftype1 to include these letters in hospital care packages for families of newly diagnosed T1 kids.

Dear family of a newly diagnosed child:

It’s undoubtedly a really hard time for you now. Your world has been turned upside down. You may be feeling scared, overwhelmed, sad, frustrated. You are probably bombarded with so much information and wondering how on earth you’ll be able to remember half of it, let alone be able to do all the things you need to do to take care of your child.

I remember this time so well. Like many other families, diabetes was the last thing on our mind and, in fact, we had no idea what Type 1 Diabetes was. I remember how, in the first days after diagnosis, I was wishing that we could fast-forward a year, to a point where we would not feel so overwhelmed, where we knew what we were doing and at peace with our new normal.

Now that we are more that three years in, I am going to tell you this: it will get better. I promise. It is a steep learning curve but before you know it, you will learn and do so much. You will become the boss of diabetes!

As much as you  can, embrace the hand you’ve been dealt. Dive in and learn. Ask questions, do your research. Learn together with your child. The more you understand about diabetes and its management, the more empowered and confident you will feel, and it will trickle down to your T1 child and the rest of the family. By now I feel like I’ve earned my honorary endocrinology degree and our daughter earned a title of a true diabadass. We have both skills and confidence to handle any situation diabetes can throw at us and it gives us a peace of mind and a feeling of pride and accomplishment.

Diabetes does not stop our daughter from doing what she loves. Be it sports, or playdates, or camps, or sleepovers, or traveling – she continues to do it all. You will learn how to make necessary adjustments, get the right kind of support and ask for appropriate accommodations. The question is not whether your child can do something with diabetes, but how it can be done. If there is one thing that I want to convey in this letter, is that you will learn how to work diabetes management around your life, not the other way around. It’s not always simple and there will be many hurdles to overcome, but I encourage you to start thinking about this right away. We don’t have a choice about having diabetes in our children’s lives, but we have a choice of how to deal with it and how to make the best of it. 

So, welcome to this crappy elite club. Did I mention that this club is full of amazing people? Please reach out to other T1 families in your community and online. Your local JDRF chapter is a good place to start. Our fellow d-peeps are an incredible source of support, encouragement, and wisdom. Our daughter also benefits immensely from having other T1 friends in her life.

Hang in there. Trust yourself and trust your child. T1 kids and families are strong and resilient. You got this. And all of us here got your back. You may not know us but we are in your corner. You are not alone!

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In Diabetes Hacks We Trust

This was supposed to be another uneventful dinner at our local eatery, just me and my girl. As we sat down, V told me she felt low. Two things are noteworthy: 1) she’s just getting over a cold and her numbers have been crazy high past couple of days, but trending much better today, which actually made her BG more unpredictable, and 2) her Dexcom has been acting out and showing ??? or out of range most of the day.

She tested and her BG was 56. OK, no biggie, we are at a restaurant anyway. She asked for regular soda but I told her no, she would only be able to have a few sips anyway. We settled on one glucose tab to bring BG up just enough to be able to bolus for dinner, and she ordered a diet soda. Miraculously, at the same time Dexcom came back to life and started alarming us of the low. Yeah, thanks buddy, tell me something I don’t know, I told it. But I should not have been so short with it because of what happened next.

V guzzled down her soda, we ordered the food and she re-tested. 96 – BINGO. She pre-bolused for the food and got a soda refill while we waited for food to come out. About ten minutes later I noticed that Dexcom was showing BG of 110 and going up. How could BG have gone up that much already and still going up? One glucose tab was not enough to do this. If anything, since she gave herself some insulin but had not consumed any carbs, I’d expect her to be trending down. And then a suspicion hit me: did they refill her glass with REGULAR soda? Soda full of sugar? Because it would explain everything.

V drank just a bit of her refill, thankfully. She asked me to taste it. I can’t tell a difference between regular and diet! But then in a flash I remember reading about a diabetes hack that involved testing sugar in soda with a glucose meter. Instead of blood you put a drop of soda on the test strip. Regular soda will yield a high number. Diet soda will yield a LO reading or a meter error.

I whipped out V’s meter, fired it up and put the strip in a drop of soda. Aaaaaannnnd….Drumroll….

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OMG. She was drinking regular soda indeed. If we did not notice an upward trend and test the soda, this would have been V’s BG in an hour or so, and it would have been a monster to deal with.

I gave her a generous dose of extra insulin and we asked for a different glass of diet soda, complete with a clean straw. You bet I tested it when it came out. Meter error message confirmed it was diet. Whew. We carried on with dinner, keeping an eye on BG trends all the while. Afterwards we went for a nice long walk with the dogs. BG maxed out at 250. We can live with that!

Whoever came up with this hack, I can’t thank you enough.

 

MasterLab 2016: The Lessons

Disclosure: Diabetes Hands Foundation provided me with a scholarship that paid for my flight, hotel, and registration to the MasterLab workshop. All opinions are mine.

I’ve been doing some thinking, some introspection. As I have shared before, I started this blog as an outlet for myself. Soon, I realized that by sharing our story I am also trying to make the world a friendlier place for my daughter and all other people with diabetes. But what lies beyond sharing our story? What diabetes-related issues do I want to focus on? What organizations do I want to support?

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I can advocate everywhere. I cannot advocate for everything.

In his opening remarks at MasterLab, Scott Johnson talked about paying attention to and feeding “your fire.” That message struck a cord. I want to advocate for something I am passionate about, something I truly believe in, something I can throw myself into without any reservations. I need to advocate where my heart is.

My heart is with #DiabetesAccessMatters. Having diabetes is hard enough. We don’t need constant battles to get access to and coverage for needed diabetes supplies. We don’t need insurance companies to play doctors and tell us what treatment is better for us. We don’t need to worry about being able to afford insulin which, for Type 1 diabetes, is literally a life-saving medication.

My heart is with diabetes tech. Sure, a cure would be nice and it will hopefully happen one day. In the meantime, diabetes tech is what continues to make  the biggest difference in easing diabetes burden, improving safety and effectiveness of diabetes management, and improving overall quality of life.

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I got to touch iLet!

My heart is with Riding on Insulin, and not only because they organize amazing adventure sports camps for T1 kids. ROI people are the kind of role models I want V to have in her life. I want her to be around T1’s who can show her via their actions that everything is possible and who will encourage her to follow through on her goals, challenge herself and live her life to the fullest. I am determined to continue my fundraising for ROI until I reach and surpass my goal.

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Proud to be RIO Global Athlete

My heart is with Camp Conrad Chinnock. Diabetes camp is such a special place for T1 kids. It’s a safe place where they can be totally free and where everyone “gets it”. I want to make camp work weekend a family tradition so that every year we can help get camp ready for summer. I may also fundraise for it in the future and participate in other volunteering events/functions. And while I am not officially fundraising for camp now, I have selected it as my charity via Amazon Smile.

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Having a blast at diabetes camp. Image credit: Camp Conrad Chinnock

My heart is with being a patient voice on behalf of my daughter. I want a seat at the table with health care providers, tech developers, policy makers, drug and device manufacturers, and other involved parties. We are all in it together and I want us to have a joint discussion on how to improve care, access and quality of life for all people with diabetes. I’m getting that seat at the table, literally, at the Diabetes Mine Innovation Summit in October. I am so honored to have been selected as one of the Patient Voices winners.

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Not long before I left for MasterLab, I created a new category for my blog: advocacy. Looks like it’s going to get quite a workout. Chaaaaaaaarge!

MasterLab 2016: The People

 

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I am traveling home after a full day of MasterLab in Orlando – a diabetes advocacy workshop put together by Diabetes Hands Foundation. I spent a day flying across country to spend 8 hours in workshop and then turn around and travel another day to come back, and it was worth it. I will write a little later about what I learned. Today it’s all about people.

I love my d-peeps of all types. None of us asked to join this elite crappy club but somehow we beat some serious odds and got in. Turns out it’s a club filled with incredible and awesome people. Maybe it’s the diabetes that makes them awesome? Or maybe you have to be awesome in the first place to get into the club?

Diabetes creates an instant bond and a feeling of trust between people. By the virtue of being in this elite club we have a lot in common, we speak the same language, we share similar stories. I knew some of the people from DOC (Diabetes Online Community); others were perfect strangers. I finally got to meet them in person and it was fabulous.

I loved talking to adult T1s and learning about their journey with diabetes. A few of them shared how, at the time of their diagnoses in the 70s, they were told that they would not live past 40 years old. Let that sink in. Imagine what it’s like to hear it from the doctors when you are a child, a teen or a young adult. Imagine what it’s like as a parent to have a doctor tell you that your child has 20-30 years to live, tops. And that they would die slowly from awful and painful diabetes complications.

Fortunately, treatment of Type 1 Diabetes has come a really long way. These people who were not supposed to live past 40 are living healthy, productive, active lives. And when V was diagnosed three years ago, the only message that we received was that it was going to be OK, that diabetes was manageable and that V would be able to live a normal, healthy, happy life. We never considered any other alternatives. I am so grateful for that.

It was also interesting to learn that most, if not all, PWD (persons with diabetes) I spoke with don’t care about the cure but are very excited about new treatments and technologies. There is a shared acceptance that the cure is far, far away but better treatments and technologies are here and they are making diabetes management easier, safer and more effective.

I am thankful for the opportunity to hang out with d-peeps. There is nothing like sitting down over a few drinks and having an honest talk about life with diabetes. I got to hear a few diabetes war stories too – some shocking, some funny, some a little scary. One person was concerned that she was scaring me off with all the information she and others were sharing. On the contrary! Being surrounded by people sharing their real-life experiences gives me hope for V’s future. We cannot protect V from the reality of life with diabetes, but by understanding it better we can give her the tools to do well. There I sat, surrounded by vibrant, resilient people, who surely had their ups and downs and made many mistakes along the way. Their diabetes management was not perfect and perhaps at times it was downright awful, but they found ways to live well and thrive. That’s good enough for me. No, it’s better than good, it’s inspirational.

Thank you for allowing me to into your lives and giving me a glimpse of my daughter’s future. Her future is bright.

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Disclosure: I applied for and received a scholarship from Diabetes Hands Foundation that covered my flight, hotel, transportation and registration. All opinions are mine.