Unhelpful

I am a member of a big diabetes facebook group. Due to a large overlap between T1D and celiac, it often comes up. When someone asks a question in regards to the interplay between the two, in general responses are helpful and informative. But once in a while I see things that really rub me the wrong way.

Cue to about a week ago, when a parent posted about their 6-year-old T1, who was very recently diagnosed with Celiac. They said that since going gluten-free, kid’d blood sugars have been running high and they were having a hard time managing it. They wanted to know if it was common.

The responses that followed emphasized that GF substitutions tend to be higher in carbs, which is 100% true. But the ensuing recommendation was to cut them out. Research Keto options! Eliminate processed foods! Home-made food is better anyway! When I was pregnant it was easier for me to just avoid those foods altogether!

FULL STOP

Did no one fully read the post? We have a 6-year-old kiddo who, on top of T1, just got diagnosed with Celiac. Their world got turned upside down again. They were just getting the hang of how to manage diabetes and deal with different foods and live with various limitations. Now they have to do it all over again, and your recommendation is to restrict even further?

Those people who made the comments are probably not parents of little kiddos with a double whammy of a diagnosis. And maybe not parents at all. Because parents know that it’s hard enough to feed a 6-year-old as is. With some of them, good luck if you can feed them anything other than PB&J sandwiches and goldfish crackers. And so many snacks are all about gluten. Enter diabetes, and you must start counting carbs and doing complicated math. Add celiac, and now you are also scrutinizing every label for obvious and hidden sources of gluten, you can no longer rely on a quick stop at Subway or pizza take out for when you are on the go or simply have no time or energy to make a meal. And the kiddo cannot eat so many foods, and at 6 they can barely understand why. This is hardly the time to recommend restriction.

Oh and by the way, for those with Celiac, gluten interferes with absorption of nutrients and vitamins. So when people go gluten free they start absorbing ALL the things better. And it can translate to needing more insulin than before because now more carbs are absorbed. So the first answer to this parent’s question should have been YES, this is a common occurrence after receiving a correct diagnosis and starting a gluten free diet. This is a good thing actually. It means that healing started.

As to what I would recommend, first it is to increase insulin as needed. Work with your Endo, be prepared that things may change quite a bit in the next few months. Go ahead and find replacements for favorite foods. Find foods that your kid will eat and will enjoy and that will result in the least amount of restriction possible. Give the entire family some time to adjust and adapt. Later on if you want to experiment with Keto recipes, or do a more drastic diet overhaul, go right ahead. But it’s OK to find your footing first.

While I’m at it, let me proudly re-display one of our favorite substitutions: frozen GF waffles from Trader Joe’s. Clocking in at 21.5g of carbs per waffle, compared to about 15g of their gluten-containing counterparts, they are delicious and totally bolus-worthy.