Sleepover: Behind The Scenes in 20 Screenshots

Sleepovers are the bane of my existence. It’s hard enough to manage T1D when V is sleeping a few feet away in her room. When she is elsewhere, we become the 24-hour on-call support and security center. Some nights are completely uneventful. Other nights we barely sleep. This is another invisible aspect of diabetes management, which most people are hardly aware of. I’m about to give you a little glimpse of what it takes to manage misbehaving BG when V is sleeping away from home.

V spent last night at her friend’s house. Before she got there, the daytime BG was fairly good. Trouble started brewing around dinner time.

So everything got back on track. Or so we thought, because at 9:52 PM…

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IOB = Insulin On Board, or amount of active insulin in her body.

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It pains me that I have to tell her to set the alarm to wake up in the middle of a night on a sleepover! What other kid has to do it? But it’s her life.
So at this point we have a plan and I am trying to get some sleep. When I open my eyes an hour later and check Dexcom, I do not like what I see, so I text V again:

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IMG_E5952.jpgI’m fighting to stay awake while doing complicated diabetes math. We need to override the pump and give more insulin because she is so high. But I don’t want to send her plummeting to a low either, especially because she is not at home!

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All that careful math, and still… She went from 400 to 225 with two arrows down in 45 minutes. And now she has a lot of active insulin in her body. Time for opposite action!

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So now it is about 1 AM. I have been sleeping poorly in 45 min increments, waking up to glance at Dexcom and make sure V is OK. I’m hoping that finally we can get things stabilized. I get to close my eyes for a couple of hrs. Then I wake up to Dexcom high alarm at 3:38 AM.

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Clearly something is not working with the pump. Absorption issue? Bubbles in the cannula? Who knows? It’s not completely useless, it’s obviously delivering some insulin, or else V’s BG would keep climbing even higher and higher. What we do know is that an injection of insulin can do wonders to bring BG into a better range. What we also do know, from the prior few hours, is that the same amount of insulin administered by the pump has been fairly useless. Understandably, V is not at all thrilled about my preferred course of action.

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V – if you are reading this, please realize that when this happens at home, I get up and give you a shot. And then I also change your pod. Usually you sleep through most of it. It sucks but it needs to be done.

I do not hesitate to put on my mean Mom hat. Also, by now we’ve been texting for nearly half an hour, it’s almost 4 fucking AM, and I have neither patience nor energy.

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I know V is really tired, mad at me, and in extra bad mood because her BG is so high. But for the record, what I really want to do is to launch into a tirade of how dare she does not appreciate how much I do for her. In all caps. But I know better because really, it is so, so hard on her. She may not believe me but I get it. So I suck it up and let her vent, try to keep my cool, and make sure everything is taken care of.

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At this point we both crash. When I wake up in the morning and check Dexcom, she’s OK. Not great, but somewhere around 200. Good enough.

By the way, the other bane of my existence is cropping and editing 20 screenshots. But if it helps you understand what we sometimes have to go through, it’s all worth it.

#makediabetesvisible 

 

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8 responses to “Sleepover: Behind The Scenes in 20 Screenshots

    • Thank you for reading. V’s had sleepovers that went totally smoothly, zero issues. But you have to be prepared for all outcomes. We have not yet had to pick her up in the middle of the night, but that is always a possibility.

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    • V rarely wakes up for Dexcom and not always for the phone. We had to experiment with different alarms and ringtones. Whenever she is at a sleepover, I have to have a chat with supervising adults and tell them that if they hear her phone going off repeatedly, to check wake her up and have her call me, and I’d take over from there.

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  1. This is so true to life! I have such similar screen shots from a couple of years ago. Now my boy has reached the party and alcohol stage- he has no hypo awareness when asleep so I am trying to be a cool mum but failing miserably. He has no interest in a pump or a CGM so I rely on him totally! Thankfully he has a mobile phone and so far so good! We drive wherever we need to to pick him up from parties! I cannot get my head around the thought that he could leave home for uni in a year!

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    • I don’t even want to think about college. Fortunately we still have good 5-6 years to go.
      You know, people got along without all this technology before. We are so used to it it’s scary to think about managing diabetes without it. But sometimes it’s helpful to remind ourselves that it’s totally possible to do it without. Still, maybe your son will have a change of heart about at least a CGM.

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