Good to go

In the past, new situations would require a more detailed explanation of T1D. My daughter has type 1 diabetes. “Here is what you should be aware of; here is what to do if she is high or low; here are the supplies; here is how to use glucagon; here is what she may need help with.”

Now that V is fully capable of handling all aspects of her diabetes care, things are different. One week before babysitting camp, I tried emailing who I thought was the right contact  to give them a heads up about V. I never got a reply and things got too busy for me to follow up. So on the day of drop off, I introduced myself to camp counselor and said this: “Just so you are aware, V has type 1 diabetes. She has all of the supplies with her and she knows what to do, she is completely independent in her care. She has her phone on her, she needs to keep it to call us if she has any questions or needs help. Please feel free to call us if you have any questions or concerns. Otherwise, she’s good to go.” The counselor asked if V had snacks for low blood sugar and I assured her that she had plenty. And that was that.

Today was back to school day. I prepared V’s supplies for health office. I like to take a minimalist approach, pack only the necessities, and refill as needed. As she is flying mostly solo, she only visits the health office if she’s unwell or runs out of supplies unexpectedly, and she always carries a glucagon and glucose tabs in her backpack.

Back up supplies, snacks and fast acting sugars will do. All fits in a relatively small box. Not pictured are a vial of back up insulin, string cheese and a couple of back up frozen gluten free meals, that go straight from our fridge/freezer to the one in health office. No letter, no flow charts, no detailed explanations.

When we arrived to school, we learned that there was a new nurse. I found her by the front gate, introduced myself and asked her where to drop off supplies. “I am V’s mom. She has type one diabetes and celiac. She’s completely independent in her care.” The nurse asked me if V was “the one with the pump” and told me she’s heard great things about her. And that a wonderful health tech who was there last year is going be there every day except Monday. Alright, this makes for a good start! I told her I’ll have V drop by and introduce herself at some point.

And that was that.

IMG_5402

Off to 7th and 4th grades they go. One is fake smiling. The other one is completely honest about his lack of enthusiasm. 

P.S. After V reads this post, I’m sure she can comment on how annoyed she was with the school not informing the new math teacher about her T1D, and her having to spend 10-15 minutes explaining it to her. She can also tell you how stupid diabeetus completely refused to cooperate and she fought highs all day long for no good reason. And we can also talk about our ongoing struggle of getting V to wake up to CGM alarms in the middle of the night, as it makes sleepovers more challenging.

But aside from that, she knows what to do. She’s good to go.

Advertisements

2 responses to “Good to go

  1. It is always wonderful when we see our kids able to take care of themselves. Even if they are 39 and have kids of their own.

    Psst, it is also cool sometimes when they cannot.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s