Diabetes Blog Week Tuesday: The Cost of a Chronic Illness

Today’s prompt is: Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  Here in the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?

For those of us living in the US, this is a hot, scary and depressing topic, especially considering current political climate and escalating insulin prices. Living with diabetes is expensive! In our family, we have three people living with chronic illness. We spend thousands every ear on medication, medical appointments and supplies. And we have good insurance! And don’t even get me started on the price of gluten-free food. I think I will save that rant for a separate post.

Once upon a time, before T1D and before we had kids, hubby and I tried a high-deductible plan. At that time we were pretty healthy, so we figured it was worth a shot. It was definitely a lot cheaper than a standard plan. Turned out that getting reimbursed for our upfront expenses took a really long time. They lost just about every claim we submitted. We eventually got our reimbursements, but knowing that we would have to front a significant amount of $ for even basic medical care really deterred us from seeing doctors. Thankfully nothing bad happened that year, but I clearly remember postponing appointments just so we would not have to deal with costs. How that we live with T1D and other chronic illnesses, I can’t imagine having to deal with a plan like this again. And yet, many people have to.

What advice do I have to share? Is moving an option? Somehow the rest of the developed world figured out how to provide affordable quality healthcare to their citizens.

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For those of us staying put, we need to organize and educate ourselves. First and foremost, do you understand the terms of your health insurance? How much is your monthly premium? Do you understand that the monthly premium does nothing except providing you with access to insurance, and that you are going to incur additional out-of-pocket costs? Do you know the difference between annual deductible and annual out of pocket maximum? What is your individual vs. family deductible? When does your deductible re-set? Do you know the difference between co-pay and co-insurance, and when you are charged one vs. the other? Are your medical supplies covered under pharmacy benefits or Durable Medical Equipment (DME)? What Rx is on the formulary and what meds won’t be covered? Do you have a separate deductible for your pharmacy benefits? Do you know who the in-network vs. out-of-network providers are? Do you know what procedures and equipment require pre-authorization? How often? How much is your ER copay?

Second, you need to advocate fiercely. Don’t take “no” for an answer. If you get a denial, appeal. Work with your doctors to document medical necessity. Learn the language, what to say, how to say it, and who to say it to, to get better results. Ask for help from your device reps – they often know how to get through the hurdles.

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Third, be strategic. We try to schedule medical appointments and supply orders strategically in the beginning of the year so that we can meet our family deductible spending the least amount of money possible. It worked well last year. This year it was a total fail. A similar strategy may work well toward the end of the year. If you met your deductible, and especially if you hit your annual out of pocket maximum for the year, stock up on those medications and supplies. Squeeze in that extra doctor’s appointment if you can/need to.

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Our little stockpile. Note the adorable doggie photobomb 🙂

Fourth, I’d tell you to be financially prepared and set some money aside for healthcare expenses. But I won’t tell you this. BECAUSE IF WE ALL HAD ENOUGH MONEY TO SET ASIDE TO PAY FOR OUR EXPENSIVE HEALTHCARE, MAYBE IT WOULD NOT BE SUCH AN ISSUE?! Yes, I just yelled. It makes my blood boil when some people insinuate that people with chronic health conditions don’t prioritize their healthcare expenses and instead spend money on stupid and unnecessary things. You know, like shiny new iPhones.

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Fifth, pride is stupid. If you need help, reach out. I belong to a vibrant and awesome group of local T1D families. At times people post on our Facebook page asking for a vial of insulin or some test strips to tide them over until their authorization goes through, or their insurance kicks in, or they get their paycheck. Other times people post giving away extras they no longer need. I’ve been on both giving and receiving end. Most T1D peeps will gladly help you out. I personally sleep a lot better at night knowing that if we are in a bind, I know who to ask for help.

Sixth, do your part in educating others about T1D and what it’s like to live with a “preexisting condition.” Help people understand the cost for someone with T1D just to stay alive. Your story and your voice matter. The better everyone can understand the human side of the cost of healthcare, the more we can achieve.

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2 responses to “Diabetes Blog Week Tuesday: The Cost of a Chronic Illness

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