Most-wanted gadget

V’s annual Celiac blood panel was done recently, and results are not great. Four years after diagnosis and her antibodies are still positive. Worse yet, the numbers crept up a little from last year. Last year things were heading in the right direction and her doctor was hopeful that with this blood work result everything would be in the negative. Not the case.

I’m really frustrated. What are we doing wrong? Obviously somewhere, somehow, V gets exposed to gluten. But where? Is there cross-contamination at home? We are not 100% gluten-free. We keep regular bread and bagels, cereal, some pre-packaged snacks, and that’s about it. All meals we make are gluten-free. We are extremely careful about cross-contamination. We have a dedicated toaster oven and a cutting board. But perhaps it’s not enough and we need to go completely gluten-free at home?

Or is the problem with restaurants where we eat? Once again, we found a few that we consider safe. However, because V does not typically have any reaction to gluten that she can feel or we can see, we have no way of telling if what she is eating is actually safe.

Or perhaps the issue was during the cruise, where getting a safe gluten-free meal proved to be rather a frustrating challenge? Since we did the blood work shortly after we returned, it may be reflective of possible cross-contamination there?

How I would love to know for sure. And guess what? There is actually a gadget out there that could help us. Nima Sensor will analyze a food sample and tell you if it contains any gluten. If we bite the bullet and go 100% gluten-free at home, we can test food at restaurants and maybe finally track down the source of cross-contamination.

There is one little glitch. The price of Nima Sensor is a cool $275. And that’s just for a starter kit. Since each food sample requires a new capsule, those will run you more. The website recommends a subscription of 12 capsules per month at a cool price of $60 per month. If we don’t do subscription, we have to pony up $72 for 12 capsules. Those capsules will go quickly if we want to test V’s meals when we dine out, even though we don’t normally eat out more than once a week.

So here I am, staring at this cool gadget, really wanting it. But it is simply too expensive.

What do we do? I have no idea. If you are reading this post and you have Celiac, I’d love for you to weigh in. I’m also curious if it’s a reasonable expectation for tests to be negative. It is really possible? Would you eat a product that, according to the label, was made on equipment shared with wheat, or is that a no-no? What about a product that is made in a facility that also processes wheat? It is unreasonable for us to think that we can live a normal life where we don’t wrap V in a bubble, allow her to eat at places other than home, and don’t have to be on edge about everything she puts in her mouth?

We are going back to the GI doctor later in the summer to discuss all this. Perhaps we can squeeze in another round of blood work just to rule out vacation cross-contamination. Aside from that, I’m at a loss.

As safe as it gets: samples that we got at the Gluten-Free Expo

 

Diabetes Blog Week Friday: More Than Diabetes

Today’s prompt is:
Lets wrap up the week by sharing a little more about ourselves, beyond the chronic illness we or our loved ones live with.  Share an interest, hobby, passion, something that is YOU.  If you want to explore how it relates to or helps with diabetes you can.   Or let it be a part of you that is completely separate from diabetes, because there is more to life than just diabetes!  

I love this topic! Screw diabetes. Instead, let’s talk about unrelated fun stuff and post gratuitous photos. Without further ado, here are some random facts about me and my T1d and gluten-free crew.

I’m a runner. I’m a very slow runner but I don’t care. I started running in 2009 and to my own amazement it became my hobby and my passion. I don’t know how I used to cope with life before I started running. So far I’ve completed 4 full marathons and 13 half marathons. I have no idea what my next race will be or when, but I’m sure it will happen sooner than later.

 

I love the ocean. I love being near, around, or in the ocean. I does not get old. When I was growing up, it was my dream to live by the ocean and now I’m living my dream. It’s also one of the reasons I love cruising. My favorite thing to do is sit on the balcony as we are sailing on the open ocean. It’s the best thing ever.

 

These two faces! We have the best doggies ever and we love them fiercely.

 

I love Start Trek TNG. Yes, Trekkie all the way. Shockingly, I don’t care about or watched Star Wars. I am probably the only person on Earth, I know. Don’t hate me, OK?

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Love this quote!

 

Last but not least, I’ll leave you with our recent family picture. Taken on a cruise, of course 🙂

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This concludes 2017 Diabetes Blog Week. I have lots of catching up to do and can’t wait to read more posts over the weekend.

Diabetes Blog Week Throwback Thursday: What Brings Me Down

Today’s Prompt: Today let’s revisit a prompt from 2014 – May is Mental Health Month so now seems like a great time to explore the emotional side of living with, or caring for someone with, diabetes. What things can make dealing with diabetes an emotional issue for you and / or your loved one, and how do you cope?

I asked V what brings her down about living with diabetes. Without skipping a beat she said “Low blood sugar brings me down.” She’s a wiseass. Wonder who she takes after?
I asked her to give it some more thought. “Think about it. What gives you the sads?” After mulling it over, she said “When I can’t eat when my BG is high. My life revolves around food, so it gives me the sads.” And then she happily scampered away.

Perhaps it’s no use asking a 12-year-old what brings her down about living with diabetes when it’s the last thing on her mind. And to her credit often she does this whole T1D thing way better than us, adults. She’ll wonder from time to time how much easier life would be without diabetes. She’ll get annoyed and frustrated about having to deal with the hassle of it. A bad high will add a generous portion of extra upset and anger when she is already upset and angry. A bad low will make her feel really lousy. Sometimes there will be a painful pod or Dexcom change. But she keeps moving along and happily living her life. How I hope that it stays this way.

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I hope she keeps this joy forever and ever

As to what brings me down? I don’t go there too often. I stay away from “what ifs”, take things in stride, and laugh at diabetes whenever I have a chance. When I do go there, it’s not so much down as worried. Worried about bad lows and future complications. Worried about V giving up on her diabetes care as she navigates adolescence. Worried about V being able to maintain good health insurance and access to healthcare when she becomes an adult. Worried about her quality of life with diabetes.

It’s not so much down as defeated. Defeated when we do everything right and still don’t get desired results. Defeated when we can’t put a dent into our credit card debt because medical expenses are relentless. Defeated when that stubborn high BG won’t come down no matter how aggressively we treat it. Defeated when we work so hard to tighten control but the A1C won’t move anywhere but up.

It’s not so much down as angry. Angry every time I hear about a cure in mice. Angry about so much ignorance and misinformation about diabetes. Angry about diabetes and diabetics being the butt of everyone’s jokes. Angry about judgment and hate.

It’s not so much down as exhausted. Exhausted after being up at night because of V’s highs or lows. Exhausted from fighting with insurance. Exhausted from having to shlep to so many doctor’s appointments. Exhausted from having to think about diabetes 24/7.

While V is young, I carry these emotions for her. It is my job as a parent to lessen her burden and I do it gladly. But I can’t do it forever. It is her diabetes and eventually, sooner rather than later, all these burdens that come with it will become hers. It is the one thing that really brings me down. 

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My really pathetic attempt at whipped cream art, created on one of V’s diaversaries. The message spells “T1D Sucks”. Because it does.

 

Diabetes Blog Week Wednesday: The Blame Game

Today’s Prompts is: Having diabetes often makes a visit to the doctor a dreaded experience, as there is invariably bad news of one kind or another.  And sometimes the way the doctor talks to you can leave you feeling like you’re at fault.  Or maybe you have a fantastic healthcare team, but have experienced blame and judgement from someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger.  Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had.  Now, the game part.  Let’s turn this around.  If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself?   Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us!

I’m pleased to say that we are very fortunate. We have a fantastic healthcare team and are surrounded by supportive friends, family and local T1D community. The only one really bad experience we had was at the water park last summer, when V was rudely confronted by a stranger who felt she was cutting the line and, since she did not look sick, did not have any reasons to have a disability pass. I wrote about it in detail in this post.  To be honest, I really don’t feel like revisiting it. When someone passes judgment inadvertently because of misinformation, but without an intent to be hurtful, I am more than happy to have a discussion. But there is no reasoning with a jerk and, aside from standing up to them, I’m not going to waste my time and energy with someone who has no desire to be supportive.

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I can, however, offer a few advanced tips to those who have to deal with us, crazy D-parents and our T1D offspring.

-Instead of asking “How is V’s diabetes?”,  ask “How is V doing with her diabetes?” When asked the former, my knew-jerk response is “Eh, it’s still there.” But even if I’m not trying to be a wiseass (hard to believe, I know), I don’t know how to answer this question. When you ask me how V is doing, I can give you an honest and specific answer. Often it’s “She has good days and bad days.” But sometimes I can share that we’ve hit a sweet spot and things have been relatively uneventful. Or that V is really struggling at the moment.

-Please don’t tell us that you “could never do it” – give shots, or count carbs, or poke fingers multiple times. If you life depended on it you would. Instead, you can say “All this sounds painful and scary and overwhelming.” And personally I take zero offense if you say that you are grateful your kids are healthy and don’t have to deal with any of this crap. No, seriously – feeling bad for us does not preclude you from feeling grateful that you don’t have to go through what we are going through. Trust me, we would not wish it on anyone.

-When V tells you she hates immunization shots, please don’t say in a very surprised tone “But shouldn’t you be used to shots by now?” First of all, have you seen a diabetes syringe? The needle is tiny and the shots are usually painless or sting just a bit. Now, compare it to a needle that is used for immunization shots. It’s a monster in comparison. Secondly, pump and CGM insertions involve needles too. They may not always be visible but they are bigger and they hurt. So the last thing V needs in her life is another shot. You can say just that.

-Last but not least, when you hear about another “breakthrough” or exciting discovery/tech development in the news, please curb your enthusiasm.

 

Diabetes Blog Week Tuesday: The Cost of a Chronic Illness

Today’s prompt is: Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  Here in the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?

For those of us living in the US, this is a hot, scary and depressing topic, especially considering current political climate and escalating insulin prices. Living with diabetes is expensive! In our family, we have three people living with chronic illness. We spend thousands every ear on medication, medical appointments and supplies. And we have good insurance! And don’t even get me started on the price of gluten-free food. I think I will save that rant for a separate post.

Once upon a time, before T1D and before we had kids, hubby and I tried a high-deductible plan. At that time we were pretty healthy, so we figured it was worth a shot. It was definitely a lot cheaper than a standard plan. Turned out that getting reimbursed for our upfront expenses took a really long time. They lost just about every claim we submitted. We eventually got our reimbursements, but knowing that we would have to front a significant amount of $ for even basic medical care really deterred us from seeing doctors. Thankfully nothing bad happened that year, but I clearly remember postponing appointments just so we would not have to deal with costs. How that we live with T1D and other chronic illnesses, I can’t imagine having to deal with a plan like this again. And yet, many people have to.

What advice do I have to share? Is moving an option? Somehow the rest of the developed world figured out how to provide affordable quality healthcare to their citizens.

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For those of us staying put, we need to organize and educate ourselves. First and foremost, do you understand the terms of your health insurance? How much is your monthly premium? Do you understand that the monthly premium does nothing except providing you with access to insurance, and that you are going to incur additional out-of-pocket costs? Do you know the difference between annual deductible and annual out of pocket maximum? What is your individual vs. family deductible? When does your deductible re-set? Do you know the difference between co-pay and co-insurance, and when you are charged one vs. the other? Are your medical supplies covered under pharmacy benefits or Durable Medical Equipment (DME)? What Rx is on the formulary and what meds won’t be covered? Do you have a separate deductible for your pharmacy benefits? Do you know who the in-network vs. out-of-network providers are? Do you know what procedures and equipment require pre-authorization? How often? How much is your ER copay?

Second, you need to advocate fiercely. Don’t take “no” for an answer. If you get a denial, appeal. Work with your doctors to document medical necessity. Learn the language, what to say, how to say it, and who to say it to, to get better results. Ask for help from your device reps – they often know how to get through the hurdles.

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Third, be strategic. We try to schedule medical appointments and supply orders strategically in the beginning of the year so that we can meet our family deductible spending the least amount of money possible. It worked well last year. This year it was a total fail. A similar strategy may work well toward the end of the year. If you met your deductible, and especially if you hit your annual out of pocket maximum for the year, stock up on those medications and supplies. Squeeze in that extra doctor’s appointment if you can/need to.

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Our little stockpile. Note the adorable doggie photobomb 🙂

Fourth, I’d tell you to be financially prepared and set some money aside for healthcare expenses. But I won’t tell you this. BECAUSE IF WE ALL HAD ENOUGH MONEY TO SET ASIDE TO PAY FOR OUR EXPENSIVE HEALTHCARE, MAYBE IT WOULD NOT BE SUCH AN ISSUE?! Yes, I just yelled. It makes my blood boil when some people insinuate that people with chronic health conditions don’t prioritize their healthcare expenses and instead spend money on stupid and unnecessary things. You know, like shiny new iPhones.

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Fifth, pride is stupid. If you need help, reach out. I belong to a vibrant and awesome group of local T1D families. At times people post on our Facebook page asking for a vial of insulin or some test strips to tide them over until their authorization goes through, or their insurance kicks in, or they get their paycheck. Other times people post giving away extras they no longer need. I’ve been on both giving and receiving end. Most T1D peeps will gladly help you out. I personally sleep a lot better at night knowing that if we are in a bind, I know who to ask for help.

Sixth, do your part in educating others about T1D and what it’s like to live with a “preexisting condition.” Help people understand the cost for someone with T1D just to stay alive. Your story and your voice matter. The better everyone can understand the human side of the cost of healthcare, the more we can achieve.

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Diabetes Blog Week Monday: Diabetes and the Unexpected

It’s time for 8th annual Diabetes Blog Week! Thank you Karen of BitterSweet Diabetes for putting this together.

I need this #DBlogWeek badly. I haven’t been blogging much lately. I’ve been overwhelmed by various things in my life and blogging/social media presence/diabetes advocacy has taken a backseat. I am hoping that this week will provide an injection of fresh motivation and inspiration.

Today’s prompt is: Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens?  Or, take this topic another way and tell us about some good things diabetes has brought into your, or your loved one’s, life that you never could have expected?

The best way to prepare for the unexpected is to expect it. Ideally, you become clairvoyant and can accurately anticipate all future problems. In reality, we all learn from our mistakes. The main lesson I learned (or rather am continuously learning ) from my mistakes is to not leave without any supplies that we cannot do without for more than an hour, no matter where we are going, how close to home we will be, etc. We always carry extra supplies with us, except when I get stupid and forget about this rule. Like that day when I took V to her Endo appointment and didn’t bring her diabetes backpack. And of course her insulin pump’s pod failed there. Thankfully they were able to hook us up with an extra pod and a vial of insulin, though for a few minutes they worried that they ran out of spare pods. Or the time when I took V to a traveling swim meet 2 hrs away from home and decided to leave her Zofran behind. Because why all of a sudden would she get a stomach virus? Of course, she was hit with the worst stomach virus I’ve ever seen, and we were stuck overnight in a hotel room in the middle of nowhere, with V violently vomiting several times per hour, hardly able to keep any liquids down.  And the battery in the ketone meter was dead! We narrowly avoided a trip to the ER, only because I was able to find batteries for the ketone meter in a store nearby and my husband was able to drive to us and bring Zofran.

Cue our last vacation. I wrote earlier about the hassle of packing all diabetes stuff, or “diacrap”, as Rick aptly suggested in his comment. I packed enough pods for daily changes. Of course, who would expect that a pod would fail every day? They are supposed to last at least 2-3 days. Nevertheless, I was not taking any chances. Sure enough, we had to change a few pods in rapid succession. One day involved two pod changes in 3 hours.

The truly unexpected part? One of the pods could not handle all of the vacation excitement and fell apart. Like, literally. It was quite amazing. These things are bomb proof. They are sturdy, waterproof, designed for all kinds of abuse, and if anyone ever tried to break one apart to see what’s inside, they will testify that it is not a simple tasks. And yet, while the bottom part was still attached to V’s arm via adhesive, this happened…
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What on Earth caused this? We have no idea. We are sending this pod back to Insulet for them to examine and figure out. Perhaps it could not handle the excitement of the FlowRider?

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And here is a close-up of what a broken pod looks like. You are welcome 🙂

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