Sound of silence

V asked to take a little break from Dexcom. Just for a day or two, she said, and then we’d put it back on. It’s been two weeks and counting. Sometimes you don’t realize how much something affects you until it’s no longer there. This break is helping me realize that I have a major case of alarm fatigue.

These two weeks have been so much quieter. No more daily high and low alerts. No more waking up in the middle of the night to false alarms. No more buzzing and beeping in the middle of various activities. Mind you, there are plenty of other beeps that keep our senses stimulated. The “Beep Beeeeep, Beep Beeeeep” of the pod, one hour after we change it or a few hours before it expires.  Or the “Click Click Click Click Click STAB!” sound of cannula insertion. Or the “SCREEEEEEEAAAAAAACHHHHHHHHHH” song of its people the pod sang to us when it failed this morning. But those are far less frequent noises compared to the daily onslaught of Dexcom alarms.

There have been times here and there I really missed our “Deckie.” V was not feeling well for a couple of days last week and I wished I had the data to better fine-tune her basal rates.  There were a couple of nights we had to get up in the middle of the night and test, instead of being able to glance at V’s BG on our phones. There were several times it would have been so much more convenient to dose by Dexcom instead of having to test. And there were a couple of times I would have treated high BG a lot more aggressively had I had Dexcom trend data to inform me of how BG was responding.

Despite mentioning here and there that she wanted to put Dexcom back on, V does not seem eager about it, and we are not pushing. Truth is, we are enjoying the sound of silence. In the meantime, we are finding value in going back to basics, staying in tune with V’s body, letting go of micromanaging BG, and using our spidey-sense to make dosing decisions. Tonight V woke up, got out of bed and came downstairs to tell me she felt really low. Indeed, she was 44. Perhaps we would have caught it much earlier with Dexcom, but we caught it anyway, treated, and back to sleep she went. A few days ago, she was 56 after intense swim practice. It would have been so much easier if we could see her BG trend on Dexcom. But V asked me if she could wait it out a little and not treat because she felt OK and because her BG often tends to shoot up after practice. I agreed. Sure enough, 15 minutes later she was 65, and settled on a solid number in lower 100’s within an hour.

IMG_3491.jpg

No Dexom? No problem. She scores 100 anyway!

This break won’t last forever. V’s middle school sleepover is approaching in a few weeks and at that time wearing Dexcom will not be negotiable. We will take it one day at a time.  And maybe there is room for a compromise? We could turn off all alerts altogether and use Dexcom solely for trend data. Or we could change low alert from 75 to 55, and high alert from 225 to 350, in order to not miss more serious lows or highs. Or perhaps my alarm fatigue will be diminished so much that I will be ready to go back to our old settings and put up with the alerts in exchange for easier and more precise BG management.

This time will come soon enough. Today, I am letting go.

 

 

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