Random, with a chance of foul language

No, not T1D, though it can definitely be that way…

My hubby asked me the other day if I was running out of ideas for this blog. Nope, plenty of ideas, but little time or energy to organize them. But then I thought, why not use this post as a giant dump of all some things T1D and gluten-free that have been occupying my head space for a while? So her we go, in no particular order.

Parental distress and T1D

In regards to the findings of this research study, which was the topic of another Insulin Nation article (not written by me): no shit Sherlock, T1D parents are stressed out. I think healthcare professionals forget about it so much that we need to have research from Yale to show them that it’s a real thing. But some parents were up in arms about the 33.5% average of people who reported distress. Only 33.5%?!

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An average can be rather useless. (Quick demo: you take a test and get a 10; I take same test and get a 90; our average is 50.) The researchers pulled and aggregated data from various studies that used widely different measurements of distress, from general parental distress to PTSD and clinical depression/anxiety. And the prevalence ranged from 10% to 74%. Most likely 74% reflects prevalence of more common and general distress, while the 10% is a figure more reflective of a clinical diagnosis. So the 33.5% means nothing, so let’s please not focus on it and instead focus on how to help T1D parents find the support they need, OK?

A recent gluten-free find that made me insanely happy:

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Refrigerated cookies ready to bake. Take them out, lay them on a cookie sheet, bake for 12-15 minutes. Perfect, easy, and so unbelievably good. Available at our local supermarket.

I made them for our fabulous New Year’s Eve celebration.

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I was going to take better pictures of these beauties but by the time I got around to it they were all gone. Eaten. Devoured. I got to inhale a few crumbs. Also, I’m too lazy to get off my chair now to look in the freezer, where we have a small stash, and look up the carb count. It doesn’t matter anyway, they are carb-worthy.

(Speaking of things that are gone… Remember my love letter to Trader Joe’s meat sticks? They had issues with supplier and no longer carry them, and may never ever again carry them. Which makes me really sad. Good thing we have these wonderful cookies to cheer me up.)

When there is a real problem with the pump

Like, when you put more air than insulin in the pod, and the pod does not realize it, and it keeps thinking it’s delivering insulin whereas in reality it’s delivering insulin-flavored air, this happens:

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Fortunately we caught on quickly enough and rectified the problem within hours. It involved changing the pod AND doing an old-school injection to speed up insulin delivery.

Ted Cruz, you are an asshole

And an ignorant one, at it. Let me be more specific: I am referring to his promise to remove gluten-free food from military, because it is just PC or a social experiment. Of course gluten-free is just a fad and the US military is trying to keep up with the Joneses. Headdesk. Facepalm. OMGWTFBBQ.

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The Pain of Saying no to Ice Cream

 

I wrote another post for Insulin Nation and it was published recently. I wrote a response to Insulin Nation’s earlier article about a research study that looked at barriers to feeding young T1Ds a healthy diet. It really got me thinking and motivated me to ask my friends in the academia to get me the full text of the research study.

I opened up my post with a personal recollection of one of my most painful memories shortly after V’s T1D diagnosis. For better or worse, the opening story gave rise to a catchy title (created by Insulin Nation), one that compels people to respond before they read the actual article. It generated some strong opinions on the Insulin Nation Facebook page. (You have to scroll down to find the post with my article.) I find it fascinating that some people seem to think that handling treats is as simple as counting the carbs and giving the right amount of insulin. And maybe it’s that simple for adults, but I find the matter a lot more complicated with kids, especially with the younger ones. And I had already written about the fallacy of thinking that a person with type 1 diabetes can eat whatever they want. 

I’d love to know what you think. Here we go: The Pain of Saying No To Ice Cream